Faith is Risky

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“Now faith is being sure of what we hope for and certain of what we do not see.” - Hebrews 11:1

I have faith that Jesus will heal Amy. This is risky because if He chooses not to heal her, I’ll look like a fool and people might be tempted to think He is either incompetent or uncaring.

I’ve been tempted to believe that maybe it’s best not to have faith that God will answer my prayers, so I can protect His reputation. I’d hate to come right out and say that I trust in God to heal my wife–and then He proves Himself to be unworthy of that trust, right?

But you see, faith always involves risk. If there is no risk of failure, it is not genuine faith.

God reminds us over and over and over in His Word that He loves it when we place our hope in Him. Over and over again … God asks for us to just believe in Him. To put our faith in Him. To just trust in Him with all our hearts instead of leaning on our own logic and understanding. (Proverbs 3:5).

During this morning’s Bible Study with Mack, I was reminded how God simply said to Abram, “Leave your country, your people and your father’s household and go to the land I will show you.” (Genesis 12:1).

Just … start … walking.

I’ll fill in the details later.

Put your shoes on and go.

If you were Abram, what questions and objections would fill your mind? “Um, which way, left or right? What should I pack—can You at least tell me what the weather will be like? Am I coming back? How far away am I moving? But I love my family. What’s wrong with staying here? Why are You doing this, anyway? Why me? You do realize, don’t You, that it’s much easier not to move? Where will I live? What will I eat? Where will I get income? What about my community and friends?

God absolutely could have filled in the details. He could have provided a specific address and explained all His plans in great detail so Abram would know exactly what was going to happen. But He didn’t because He wanted Abram to simply trust Him. And when Abram started walking, when his faith turned into real action, God “credited it to him as righteousness.“ (Galatians 3:6).

So no. I don’t have a confirmed written guarantee that Jesus will heal Amy. I didn’t hear His audible voice telling me when or how He will heal her.  If I knew the future, it wouldn’t be faith, would it?

Because of the LORD’s great love we are not consumed, for his compassions never fail. They are new every morning; great is Your faithfulness. I say to myself, "The LORD is my portion; therefore I will wait for him.” (Lamentations 3:22-24)

Lord you absolutely are my portion. I will trust in You, even though it’s risky.

Rick Mumford